Cathedral_Hive_Deluxe_Living_Roof

 

Purchase the Fully Assembled Cathedral Hive

and see all the Unique Features of the Hive

 

Unique features of the Cathedral Hive

 

* Three sided hexagonal top bar structure
     
-Allows for superior comb stability   
     -Greater potential for straight comb

     -Zero to no attachment

     -Fully drawn out honey combs weigh 9-10 pounds  
     -Very attractive Hexagonal combs!!

 


* Integrated top bar feature we call the "Super Highway"
     -Specially designed top bars that improve the bees efficiency, health and overwintering ability

 


* Colony Regulated Venting System
   -Carefully engineered ventilation design that allows the bees to regulate
air flow
   

* Views into the bees world
    -1 viewing window
   
-Offer greater learning and monitoring of the bees health
    -Allows bee guardian to track progress
    -Enjoy observing the bees world without disturbing them
    -Get the optional Glass Flaseback to view the bees as you work the hive

 

 * Innovative Living Roof
    -Helps bees to regulate critical hive temperatures
    -Cuts down on UV from the sun
    -Reduces electromagnetic radiation and outside noise

 

 

  * A joy to work the hive!
    -Access any comb in the hive like a framed hive
    -Bees use the passage holes to move out of the way when removing combs
    -Use the same great top bar hive tools


The Fully Assembled Cathedral Hive includes:
- Hive body, both top and bottom
- 21 hexagonal shaped top bars with ventilation system
- A Ventilated Roof
- Hexagonal false back
- 1 viewing window and cover

- White pine wood body, reclaimed redwood top bars
- Setup Instructions included

 
Dimensions: 31" L x 20" W x 15 1/2" H
(the landing board adds 2" total length then is 33")


$878.00  
The Cathedral Hive Top Bar Hive Plans Only _ Add to Cart


Limited Availability!
Please know that all of the hives we make and provide are handmade locally by our woodworker here in Boulder, CO and not from a factory. The Cathedral Hives can take about 2 weeks for delivery once ordered from our shop. It may be sooner but due to the complexity of creating the hives it may be 2 weeks until shipment of your hive.


Cathedral Hive top bar no spacers needed
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 


Front Blank Board


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Close up of the Front of the hive, Bottom Section only with the Blank Board in place at the front of the hive.

You have to ask yourself what is the purpose of the Front Blank Board ? If you did not have this Board, when the top of the Cathedral
is removed, all the bees and the combs would be exposed ! Although it is not in the plans yet, you will want to secure this board
to the front of the hive with a couple of screws. Securing this Blank Board will create a stable wall for the Hex bars to lean against
until comb is drawn out. Once the comb is hanging below the Hex Bars they will be naturally very stable, but in the beginning they
are quite unstable with out the stabilizing Blank Board.


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 

Detail of the Blank Board set in place at the front of the hive looking out the entrance. Here this detail shows how the Hex Bar shelf stops
short of the front of the hive and the Blank board slips in between. Also note in the photo in the upper right, where the sun flair is, that
The Hex Bar Shelf must fit tight to the Blank. If there is a gap the bees will have a tiny entrance to crawl out onto the top of the Hex Bars.

Note: In photo we have not secured the Blank to the front of the hive yet. Just try to imagine a couple of screws here.




Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Detail of the extended Landing Board at the entrance of the hive. How is the entrance cut into the front face? We construct the hive
with the full front face screwed into place and glued, then with a hero move, we take the whole bottom half of the hive put it on end and
run it twice through the table saw.  This cuts the entrance slot and then we just add the Landing Board E
xtension.
Brace Support Details

Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
A Brace Support at the front of the hive. Be careful when looking at this photo the side of the front of the hive kind of blends into the
brace support.




Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 

Brace Supports on the Bottom Section of the hive
. To read this photo correctly, notice how the hive is tipped up and we are seeing the bottom of the hive.








Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Vent Hole on Top Upper Section of the hive

Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Brace Supports on the Upper Section


Screwing the Front Panel onto the hive sides





Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Vent Hole Screen Covering
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Vent Holes on Top Upper Section of the hive with screen stapled in place covering the holes.
This screen keeps wasps from setting up home in the top of the hive.

The Falseback Details


Detail of False back with two spline joints.

Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Glass falseback, you still want to use the wooden Falseback behind the Glass Falseback
to ensure that the light coming form the back of the hive does not disturb the bees.


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
The Glass Falseback



Details of the Cathedral Bars

Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Top Bars
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
The holes on the Passage Ways on the Cathedral Bars


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Top Bars
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
The bees will fill in the slots with Propolis where they don't want any air venting out. Typically the bees
will close up the slots over the brood nest and leave the slots open in the back of the hive.



Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Top Bars
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Each Top Bar has one side created with a vent slot. Here the Vented Top Bars are placed correctly with the slot on the right side of the bar,
all facing the same direction.



Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Top Bars
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Here the Vented Top Bars are
placed incorrectly. The slots should not face each other or bees will be able to crawl out of the slot!

Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Closeup of Top Bars resting on ledge of Bottom Section of the hive and the Blank Board in front of the top bars at the front of the hive.

Remember that little hole I warned you about? This photo shows the little black hole where the bees WILL want to crawl through.

We don't want this hole, so make sure your top bar shelf is snug against the front Blank.

Try to get the Hex Bars even on the shelf just after you install the bees. The bees will start gluing everything together with propolis.
After a week or so the bees will have added propolis, this will make it easy to now close up any gaps using a hive tool.


Window Cover


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Window Cover
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Closeup of the Window Cover


Cathedral Hive Details Fully Assembled Hive Window Cover
(Photo credit: Corwin Bell) 
Closeup from the inside of the hive looking at the glass window with of the Window Cover in place on the outside of the hive.
There is a good tight fit and no light leaks to disturb the bees inside.




Have Fun and be Safe!

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