Article by Corwin Bell & Joe Callus

Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

The Cathedral Hive making the top bars Step by Step

(This article is in progress)

There are two main methods for creating the Cathedral Hive top bars.

This Article we will look at the steps for making the top bars with a band saw or if you are a skilled woodworker,
a table saw.

Joe from Canada was gracious enough to give us the method he used for making the Cathedral Hive top bars on the band saw.

 

 

There are 2 different methods for machining the Cathedral Hive Top Bars



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars

Method 1 - BAND SAW

STARTS WITH A BLANK THAT IS 1 3/8” X 1 3/8” X 8”
the mitered angles
are cut and the holes drilled on squared material, making this process easier.

 

Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars

Method 2 -TABLE SAW - Advanced woodworking
USES 2X6 OR 2X8 NOMINAL BOARD  (NOMINAL IS 1 1/2” THICK)

AFTER CUTTING, the FINAL BAR WILL be a THICKNESS OF 1 1/4"
the mitered angles are harder to clamp and the Holes are harder to drill on an angled bar

 



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars

Detail of drilling and cutting top bars
and cutting top bars from a  2" x 6" nominal board


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars

Detail of cutting the Ledge that the top bars will sit on inside the Lower Section
of the hive




Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
1)    Starting with a square top bar blank, 1 3/8 x 1 3/8.


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
2)    Miter top bar blank at 30 degrees



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
3)    Slide to stop and Miter the other end.


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
4)    Nice !


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
5)    Jig for drilling top bar holes. This is a pretty cool jig that ensures the holes are nicely aligned.



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
6)    Jig for drilling top bar holes, side view !


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
7)    Drilling top bar holes: First Hole



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
8)    Drilling top bar holes: Second Hole


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
9)    Drilling top bar holes: Flip part over and drill, Third Hole


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
10)    Drilling top bar holes: Fourth Hole


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
11)    Drilled top bar



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
12)    Jig cutting the spline on slot on the table saw. The table saw is using a 1/4 Dado set so the spline
is easier to work with.

 

is Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
13)    Jig side



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
14)    A space is created to allow the Dado blade to pass through the jig.




Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
15)    The blade space created in the jig


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

16)    



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)


17)   


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

18)   


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
19)    Jig slides along fence, through saw

 


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
20)    Shoulder cut on top bar





Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
21)    Top Bar Angle cut on band saw

 



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
22)    Top Bar Angle cut on band saw

 


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

23)    Top Bar Angle cut on band saw

 


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

24)    flip Top Bar 

 
Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

25)    second Angle cut on band saw

 




Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

26)    Notice the 1/4 shoulder being created

 



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

27)    Cool Clamp



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
Alternative to Spline Joints for top bars: EXPERIMENTAL !

28)   
A Dowel here a drill press is tried but the exact alignment would be difficult to maintain. So it is recommended
that the joint, or two parts are clamped to the work bench and both pieces are hand drilled in one go, then put
in a glued dowel while the bar is still clamped on the bench. Hand drilling both parts at once would make sure
to get the right alignment in the joint.





Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
29)   
Well here a drill press is tried but the exact alignment would be difficult to maintain. So it is recommended
that the joint, or two parts are clamped in good alignment and drilled in one go with a hand drill, then glued.

It looks to me the like you might be able to glue the bar segments in the Spline jig clamp and then drill them and dowel them and then
run the completed bar through the band saw. I am just not sure one of the segments would not get in the way of the band saw.


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
30)   



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

31)  



 

Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)


32)  



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)


33)  

looks pretty good to me !





Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)
Alternative to Spline Joints for top bars:
A Screw


34)  




 



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)


Pre-drill the hole for the screw

34)

 

 



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

Putting in the screw

35)



Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

The screw is in

36)


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

37)
So it is recommended
that the joint, or two parts are clamped to the work bench and both pieces are hand drilled in one go, then put
in a glued dowel while the bar is still clamped on the bench. Hand drilling both parts at once would make sure
to get the right alignment in the joint.

 


Cathedral Hive Maching Top Bars
(Photo credit: Joe C., Canada)

38)

 

 

 

 

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